Showing posts with label BriskHeat. Show all posts
Showing posts with label BriskHeat. Show all posts

Thursday, July 5, 2018

Cloth Heating Jackets for Pipes, Tees, Valves, Fittings, and other Process Equipment

Cloth heating jacket
Cloth heating jacket (Briskheat)
Industrial heating applications are numerous and varied. Heating requirements can range from freeze protection to precise maintenance of process temperature in piping, equipment, or vessels. Two commonly employed heating sources are electric resistance heaters and plant steam. While each has certain advantages, steam may not always be available or practical. Electric heat offers a number of positive attributes.
  • Ease of design and installation
  • Precise control
  • Uniform heating across surfaces
  • Low maintenance requirement
  • Portability
  • Economical to purchase and install
  • Wide array of shapes, sizes, and configurations
  • Standard and custom products for every application
Cloth heating jackets are one of many electric heater variants. Formed to fit specific valves, fittings, or other items, these reusable heaters are comprised of an exterior of rugged fabric, a layer of thermal insulation, a heating blanket, and an electrical connection point or fitting. Hook and loop fasteners facilitate the unwrapping or opening of the jacket to allow for installation and removal. The surface remains cool to the touch for most applications. Control can be provided by any type of temperature controller, with prewired options available for inclusion with the heating jacket.

Construction of cloth heating jacket
Construction of cloth heating jacket (click for larger view).

Liner and Facing Material (Inside and Outside cloth material)
  • PTFE - Standard facing material. Exposure temperatures up to 500°F (260°C). Up to Class 10 environments. 
  • BriskClean - For cleanroom class 10. Exposure temperatures up to 600°F (315°C). 
  • Silicone Cloth Adds a degree of moisture and chemical resistance. Exposure temperatures up to 500°F (260°C).
  • Samox® -High temperature cloth. Exposure temperatures up to 1100°F (593°C). Up to Class 100 environments.
  • Aluminum- Facing material option. Exposure temperatures up to 450°F (232°C).
  • Fiberglass cloth - Liner material option. Exposure temperatures up to 900°F (482°C). Up to Class 100 environments.
Closure Options
  • Hook and loop fastener
  • Hook and lace
  • Grommets
Insulation (placed in between liner and facing)
  • Fits your application based upon process temperatures. BriskHeat's industry leading engineers will design your system with the correct amount of insulation. Insulation will make your system energy efficient and touch-safe.
Voltage Options
  • 120 - 600VAC
  • Single phase
  • 3 Phase (Wye)
  • 3 Phase (Delta)
  • 60 Hz.
  • 50 Hz.
  • DC
Power Plug / Connector Options
  • Mate-N-Lock
  • Twist lock
  • CPC connector
  • Bare wire
  • Other electrical connections available
Built-in Controlling / High-limit Safety Thermostat Options
  • 180°F (82°C)
  • 248°F (120°C)
  • 302°F (150°C)
  • 347°F (175°C)
  • 392°F (200°C)
  • 500°F (260°C)
  • Other temperatures available
Built-in Temperature Sensor Options
  • Platinum RTD
  • Type J thermocouple
  • Type K thermocouple
  • Thermistor
  • Other temperature sensors available
Built-in Low-Limit Alarm Thermostat Options
  • 180°F (82°C) with 30°F (17°C) differential
  • 248°F (120°C) with 50°F (28°C) differential
  • Other temperatures available

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Electric Heaters Designed for Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBCs)

Wrap-Around IBC Tote Tank Heaters
Wrap-Around IBC Tote Tank Heaters
(Briskheat)
Intermediate Bulk Containers (IBCs), also known as IBC totes, or pallet tanks, are reusable industrial containers designed for the transport and storage of bulk liquid or granulated chemicals, food ingredients, solvents,  pharmaceuticals, or other material.

Often, to maintain optimum viscosity, there is need to apply heat to the contents of a tote to raise and maintain it's temperature.  This ensures the material remains ready for production and is easy to dispense. Without external heat, increased production cost or damage to equipment can occur. Heaters are also used to protect temperature sensitive material inside the IBC tote from cold or freezing, thus reducing the possibility of loss due to ruined materials.

The most effective way to heat IBCs are with specialized electric heaters referred to as "wrap-around IBC tote tank heaters". These heaters are adjustable to fit many size totes, provide the required wattage to maintain a temperature between 50 deg. F and 160 deg. F. and also include built-in 1/4” fiberglass insulation for thermal efficiency. They can be used with caged, plastic, or metal IBC tote tanks. Installation and secure fit are accommodated with adjustable nylon straps and buckles.

As the contents of the tote empties, there is no reason to continue to heat it's upper zone, so IBC heaters include independent, dual zone temperature control that separately controls the upper and lower zones of the bottle.  A built-in high limit thermostat and a grounded heating element prevents overheating and worry-free operation. A standard 120 volt, grounded 3-prong plug is provided for easy power connection (240V models have bare wires).

Silicone Rubber IBC Tote Tank Heaters
Silicone Rubber IBC Tote Tank Heaters
(Briskheat)
An alternative design are silicone rubber IBC tote tank heaters, for use on totes with removable bottles. Placed inside the IBC cage, directly under, and in direct contact with the bottle, they provide very fast and efficient heat-up. Made from fiberglass reinforced silicone rubber and 1/2” thick foam padding, these heaters provide outstanding durability. This design comes complete with a grounded heating element, thermocouple temperature sensor, and digital temperature controller, and is approved for use indoors and outdoors.

Common Uses for IBC Totes:

  • Lubricants/Oils
  • Solvents
  • Detergents
  • Adhesives
  • Liquid/Granulated/Powdered Food Ingredients 
  • Honey/Syrup/Molasses
  • Chemicals
For information on any IBC, tote, or tank heating application, contact Alliance Technical Sales by visiting https://alliancets.com or calling 630-321-9646

Friday, March 9, 2018

Quickly Solve a Range of Freeze Protection Challenges With Pre-Assembled Self-Regulating Heating Cable

preassembled self regulating heat cable freeze protection
Pre-assembled self-regulating heat cable sets can speed
installation of freeze protection for piping systems.
Image courtesy BriskHeat Corp.
Heat tracing a pipe, from start to finish can be time consuming. Selecting the various components, starting with the heating cable itself, extends through termination kits, controllers, mounting hardware and other electrical hardware needed to put the heating system in operation. BriskHeat has a product that, for many applications, offers a very simple and quick solution.

Pre-assembled self regulating heat cable is available in two voltage ranges, two watt densities, and prefabricated lengths up to 150 feet. Each cable is terminated at each end, saving the installer time. The cable is flexible enough for a spiral installation or to wrap around valves in the piping system. The self regulating aspect of the cable negates the need for a controller and power switching devices. Assemblies targeted for 120 volt applications are provided with a factory installed plug. The 208-277 volt cables will arrive with bare wire leads for installation of a customer provided connector. The cable can be easily installed using fiberglass or aluminum tape. Suitable insulation applied over the finished work will improve the performance of the heating system.

Share your heat trace and freeze protection challenges with industrial heating specialists, leveraging your own knowledge and experience with their product application expertise.


Sunday, February 18, 2018

New Silicone Heating Tapes For Industrial Heating Applications

flexible silicone rubber heat tape
Ultra-flexible silicone rubber heat tape easily wraps
smaller diameter pipes.
Image courtesy BriskHeat Corp.
There are many places throughout industrial and commercial installations where freeze protection or another reason for pipe heating exist. It is valuable to have a solution that can be applied quickly and easily to allow resources to remain focused on the larger mission of the organization.

BriskHeat has introduced their XtremeFLEX® line of silicone sheathed heat tape that combines plug and play installation ease with maximum flexibility and a built-in preset thermostat. The product can be installed with a bend radius of 1/4", allowing its use on small process lines of many types. The manufacturer provides a listing of some possible uses.
  • Viscosity and temperature control
  • Freeze protection
  • Integrally heated tools
  • Gas tubing
  • Valves
  • Laboratory heating
  • Plastic bending heat tape
  • External heating of dies and tools
  • Temporary heat
  • Hopper throat heater
  • Heat Tape for Pipes
More product information is provided in the brochure included below. Share your potential applications and heating challenges with an industrial heating specialist. Leverage your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.


Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Freeze Protection for All Sorts of Commercial and Industrial Things

Freeze protection requirements are ubiquitous and take many
forms. Each has a best solution employing a specialized heater.
Keeping process or inventory liquids from freezing, or becoming extremely viscous, can be an important part of any commercial or industrial operation. Freeze damage to equipment, piping, or containers can result in a wide array of consequences, all of them likely to be negative.

Developing an overall plan for freeze protection can be advantageous to attacking each application on an independent basis.

  • Having a common vendor for all freeze protection equipment and supplies can help designers develop a knowledge base about how to meet application challenges with specific products, speeding implementation time. Service techs become familiar with applied products and methods, building their skills and efficiency at installing and maintaining applications throughout the facility.
  • Identify all locations where freeze protection is needed. Develop a baseline of the methods employed and equipment installed to meet the needs of each location. Good records form the basis for good maintenance and the ability to make decisions regarding the operation and performance of each system.
  • When selecting the products or methods to employ for freeze protection, consider the environment in which the hardware will be installed. Will it require protection from physical damage, chemical attack, or extreme weather. Is the installation space considered a hazardous zone, requiring special certifications for the heating equipment?
  • The availability and control of applied heat can also be important. Is there a need for the heating system to deliver highly variable amounts of heat across the range of possible operating scenarios, in order to avoid overheating the process or stored materials? How quickly will the system need to ramp up to the desired operating temperature or respond to changes in an operating process?
These questions, and probably others specifically related to your application, should be part of the consideration for freeze protection applications. Enlisting the cooperation of a process heat specialist can apply leverage to your own process knowledge and experience to develop an effective solution to each challenge.

Check this link for a copy of the Freeze Protection Planning Guide.

Friday, July 28, 2017

Heated Impulse Lines on Pressure Gauges and Transmitters

self regulating heat trace cble
Successive cutaway view of self-regulating heat trace
cable showing various layers of material
Courtesy BriskHeat
Temperature of the environment surrounding process equipment and instruments can sometimes have a deleterious impact on its function. A common example is cold weather impact on the impulse lines connecting pressure gauges or transmitters to process piping in outdoor or unheated locations. While the process lines may be large, with sufficient mass flow and insulation to prevent freezing, this may not be the case for small diameter impulse lines. Liquid freezing in cold weather conditions can be a threat to process operation, depending on the type of liquid being used. A safeguard exists for impulse lines where the lines can be traced with a heat source, allowing for counteraction of the environmental conditions and maintenance of proper operation.

There are a number of ways to deliver heat to an impulse line. Recognize two essential goals, with the first being to prevent freezing or other changes to the fluid in the line that would impact the response or accuracy of the instrument reading. The second goal is related to the heat tracing itself. The delivered heat must not be great enough to impact the fluid in the impulse line and generate a false pressure reading. Optimally, delivering heat in a fashion that is limited to what is necessary to maintain the impulse line fluid in an ideal working state is best.

One example of heat tracing an impulse line is through the placement of a tube or small diameter pipe, located in close proximity to line, through which low pressure steam flows. Insulation is applied to the bundle and the steam line serves as a heat source. The tube transfers heat to the impulse line when steam flows. After the steam heats the impulse line, a steam trap accompanying the system collects condensate for return to the boiler. It is also conceivable that the steam line could ultimately vent to atmosphere, with no condensate return. There are a number of concerns that must be addressed in the design of the steam portion of this scenario, since it would be necessary to keep any condensate from freezing under all anticipated operating conditions, including process shutdown.

A second common solution for freeze protection of impulse lines is through the installation of electric heat tracing. Two-wire cable serves as protection against the cold. When powered, the heat from the cable keeps the line warm. Electric heat tracing is available in a broad range of physical configurations, including cables, tape, blankets, and other flexible and solid shapes. Control of the electric heat system can be accomplished with an external controller and sensor, or a self-regulating heat trace cable can be used. As with a steam heating system, there are some specific considerations for electric heat tracing. Thermal insulation is still considered a best practice. Electric power must be delivered to the installation, and a means of monitoring heat trace performance for faults or failure should be included in the design.

Share your heat tracing requirements and challenges for process piping and other industrial applications with a product specialist. There are many options and product variants from which to choose. A consultation can help direct you to the best solution.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Common Industrial and Commercial Process Heating Methods

industrial heat process
Many industrial processes utilize heat as an energy input
Many industrial processes involve the use of heat as a means of increasing the energy content of a process or material. The means used for producing and delivering process heat can be grouped into four general categories.
  • Steam
  • Fuel
  • Electric
  • Hybrid
The technologies rely upon conduction, convection, or radiative heat transfer mechanisms, soley or in combination, to deliver heat to a substance. In practice, lower temperature processes tend to use conduction or convection. Operations employing very high temperature rely primarily on radiative heat transfer. Let's look at each of the four heating methods.

STEAM

Steam based heating systems introduce steam to the process either directly by injection, or indirectly through a heat transfer device. Large quantities of latent heat from steam can be transferred efficiently at a constant temperature, useful for many process heating applications. Steam based systems are predominantly for applications requiring a heat source at or below about 400°F and when low-cost fuel or byproducts for use in generating the steam are accessible. Cogeneration systems (the generation of electric power and useful waste heat in a single process) often use steam as the means to produce electric power and provide heat for additional uses. While steam serves as the medium by which heat energy is moved and delivered to a process or other usage, the actual energy source for the boiler that produces the steam can be one of several fuels, or even electricity.

FUEL

Fuel based process heating systems, through combustion of solid, liquid, or gaseous fuels, produce heat that can be transferred directly or indirectly to a process. Hot combustion gases are either placed in direct contact with the material (direct heating via convection) or routed through tubes or panels that deliver radiant heat and keep combustion gases separate from the material (indirect heating). Examples of fuel-based process heating equipment include furnaces, ovens, red heaters, kilns, melters, and high-temperature generators. The boilers producing steam that was described in the previous section are also an example of a fuel based process heating application.

ELECTRIC

Electric process heating systems also transform materials through direct and indirect means. Electric current can be applied directly to suitable materials, with the electrical resistance of the target material causing it to heat as current flows. Alternatively, high-frequency energy can be inductively coupled to some materials, resulting in indirect heating. Electric based process heating systems are used for heating, drying, curing, melting, and forming. Examples of electrically based process heating technologies include electric arc furnace technology, infrared radiation, induction heating, radio frequency drying, laser heating, and microwave processing.

HYBRID

Hybrid process heating systems utilize a combination of process heating technologies based on different energy sources or heating principles, with a design goal of optimizing energy performance and overall thermal efficiency. For example, a hybrid steam boiler may combine a fuel based boiler with an electric boiler to take advantage of access to low off-peak electricity cost. In an example of a hybrid drying system, electromagnetic energy (e.g., microwave or radio frequency) may be combined with convective hot air to accelerate drying processes; selectively targeting moisture with the penetrating electromagnetic energy can improve the speed, efficiency, and product quality as compared to a drying process based solely on convection, which can be rate limited by the thermal conductivity of the material. Optimizing the heat transfer mechanisms in hybrid systems offers a significant opportunity to reduce energy consumption, increase speed and throughput, and improve product quality.

Many heating applications, depending on scale, available energy source, and other factors may be served using one or more of the means described here. Determining the best heating method and implementation is a key element to a successful project. Alliance Technical Sales specializes in electric heating applications and facets of the industrial production of steam. Share your process and project challenges with them and combine your facilities and process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Keep Condensation at Bay in Your Facility

condensation on glass with cold drink
Condensation accumulates water on
the exterior of this cold glass
Condensation, the accumulation of liquid water on a surface through contact with humid air, can be harmless in some settings, an undesirable or even damaging occurrence in others. In situations where condensation is undesirable, taking steps to prevent the conditions that preclude its formation are relatively simple and deliver a good payback.

What is condensation? In general usage, the term refers to the formation of liquid water droplets that occurs when humid air contacts a cooler surface. It is the liquid moisture that accumulates on the exterior of a glass containing a cold drink. Properly, the term condensation names the process of a vapor changing to a liquid. It is the opposite of evaporation. Condensate (note the different word form) is the liquid accumulated through the condensation process. This article is limited to condensate that forms when atmospheric air contacts a cold surface, so the general usage term condensation will be used.

Where can it happen? Water vapor is contained in air when it has sufficient energy to remain in the vaporous state. Remove some of that heat energy and a calculable quantity of the water vapor will no longer be supported, condensing into liquid water. The temperature at which any given quantity of air will start to shed some of its water vapor content is primarily determined by the concentration of water vapor in the air. A higher water vapor content will result in a higher temperature at which the water vapor will begin to condense. In everyday terms, higher relative humidity leads to a higher temperature at which condensation takes place.

What is the range of impact? Condensation appears to us as water that almost magically manifests on a surface. It seems to come right out of thin air.....because that is where it came from. It can form locally or broadly throughout an area. The potential impact of condensation arises from the fact that it is liquid water. Anything that will be damaged by water will be adversely impacted by condensate formation on its surface. This includes rust and corrosion of metals, spotting on material or object surfaces, the promotion of mold and mildew, and a wide range of other undesirable effects. Accumulated condensate on overhead objects or surfaces can eventually drip onto equipment, materials, and work areas situated below. Puddles of water on a floor can also create a hazard.

Prevention is the best, maybe the only cure.

How to prevent condensate formation?

  • Ventilation - If there is a source of moisture in a space that is elevating the humidity, continually diluting the space moisture content by introducing fresh air with a lower moisture content may be an effective prevention method. Ventilation relies on the fresh air conditions always being sufficient for moisture reduction without creating some other adverse impact on the space. For example, ventilating with outdoor air may be effective throughout only part of the year. Without a reliable source of ventilation air with known conditions, this method may not always deliver the desired results. Ventilation is an active method that requires energy to move the ventilation air. Additional energy may be required to adjust the temperature or moisture conditions of the ventilation air, as well.
  • Insulation - The surfaces where condensation occurs can be isolated from the moist air by insulating materials. This is common with HVAC ductwork and process piping. If done properly, this method is effective. The goal is to create a new surface that does not exhibit the cooler temperatures of the isolated surface. The thickness and reduced thermal conductivity of the insulation material will achieve this. There is also a vapor barrier on the exterior of the insulation that prevents entry of moisture laden air into the insulation material.  It is important the the vapor barrier installed as part of the insulating process remain intact and undamaged. Otherwise, water vapor will enter the insulating material and condense, with the potential for a localized failure of the insulating scheme. Insulation is a passive measure that requires no added energy to remain effective.
  • Dehumidification - Outright reduction of moisture contained in the air of an enclosed space will reduce the temperature at which water vapor condenses. Dehumidification machinery is available in a wide range of sizes and performance levels to suit almost any scenario. Though it requires energy to operate, the machinery is generally simple and operates automatically to maintain a space condition that will not support condensation.
  • Heating - Some cases can be most effectively treated using the application of a small amount of heat to the surface where condensation forms. This active method can be very effective when the need is localized. Also, surface heaters can be fabricated that will fit where insulation will not, and the heating assemblies may be more resistant to impact and damage than insulating materials. Proper control of heating equipment will minimize energy consumption.
Implementing an effective plan to combat condensation involves the identification of the conditions that promote its formation in your own facility. Selecting the best prevention plan calls for consideration of costs and reliability of various schemes. Active methods, such as heating or dehumidification, have some capacity for adjustment if conditions change over time. Insulation plans should have sufficient headroom or safety factor in their design to accommodate unforeseen conditions.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Properly Applying Flexible Heat Tape




Heat tape, with its flexibility, provides a good means of delivering heat to a wide range of process applications. It can be applied to pipes, vessels, or other objects that need to be heated for any number of reasons. The range of available product materials and watt densities assures that there is a heat tape configuration for almost every application. This video shows how to properly apply and install heat tape to get the best performance and maintain safe operating conditions.

Share your process heating requirements of all types with an industrial heating specialist, combining your process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Silicone Rubber Heating Blankets - Special Delivery for Industrial Heating Applications

silicone rubber heating blanket industrial heater
Silicone Rubber Heating Blanket
One of countless shapes and sizes
Courtesy Briskheat
Electric heaters for industrial and commercial applications are available in an almost dizzying range of types, materials, and forms. One of those is the silicone rubber heater.

Stock shapes and sizes are available from many manufacturers, but one distinct advantage of silicone rubber heaters is their flexibility. The resistance heater wires are encased in a silicone rubber sheet, providing the ability to wrap the assembly around an object or manipulate it into a close fit with the target of a heating application. The silicone rubber encasement also provides a high level of protection for the heater wires from impact, moisture, and some chemicals.

The watt density of the heaters can be specified to provide a good match between the delivery of heat and the need for it. Custom shapes and configurations can be manufactured to order, and on board or remote controllers provided. Pressure sensitive adhesive is a common option that facilitates the installation of the heater assembly to a part or vessel.

The maximum application temperature is in the range of +450°F (+232°). These heaters are a useful selection option for a large range of operations demanding heat to be applied directly to a surface, object, tank, drum, or other vessel. Share your industrial heating requirements with product specialists for the best match up between heater technology and your application.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Alliance Technical Sales Adds Industrial Process Heating

industrial heaters heat trace cable sheet blanket silicone rubber
Array of industrial heating products
Courtesy Briskheat
Alliance Technical Sales recently reached a new representation agreement with BriskHeat Corporation. The industrial heating products and systems manufactured by BriskHeat expand and complement the Alliance product and capabilities offering.

BriskHeat manufactures a broad line of heaters, insulators, and controls for almost every industrial application.
  • Cloth Heating Jackets and Insulators
  • Heating Tapes
  • Heating Cable
  • Laboratory Heaters and Equipment
  • Etched Foil Heaters
  • Silicone Rubber Heaters
  • Drum Heaters
  • Tote Tank / IBC Heaters
  • Gas Cylinder Warmers
  • Enclosure Heaters
  • Hopper Heating Systems
  • Personal Comfort Heating Solutions
  • Hazardous-Area Heaters
  • Plastic Bending Heaters
  • Resistance Wire
  • Temperature Controllers
  • Temperature Controllers for Outdoor Use
  • Insulators
  • Heaters and Controls with Canadian Approvals
  • Composite Curing Solutions
Share your industrial and process heating requirements with the product specialists at Alliance Technical Sales. Combining your process expertise with their product knowledge will produce effective solutions.